The 1970 Lancia Stratos HF Zero Super Car Concept

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Around 1970, a rivalry was brewing between the famous design houses of Pininfarina and Bertone. The coachbuilders were trying to outdo each other with flamboyant and beautiful automobiles. Bertone shot first, with the Alfa Romeo Carabo. Pininfarina returned the volley with the Ferrari P5, the 512S Berlinetta and the Modulo, which debuted to great fanfare at the 1970 Geneva motor show.

image credit: ultimatecarpage

Not to be outdone, Bertone came to the 1970 Turin motor show fully loaded with a wedge-shaped creation originally called the Stratoslimite, or “limit of the stratosphere,” later Stratos HF Zero.

image credit: ultimatecarpage

The initial concept behind the Zero was for Bertone’s people to see how low they could build a car. It may have been a response to Pininfarina’s Modulo, which stood at only 93.5 centimeters tall. The final version of the Stratos Zero peaked at just 84 centimeters.

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Nor was the Zero was just a design concept; it was a fully functioning prototype. The futuristic design featured a row of headlights across the front with 55-watt bulbs. The turn signals were sequential, going from the center to the edges. The rear ribbon of lights consisted of a strip of 84 mini bulbs.via(autoweek)

The Zero was sourced from existing Lancia parts, according to former interior chief designer Eugenio Pagliano, and the 1.6-liter V4 engine was scooped from the Lancia Fulvia HF. It made 115 hp with two twin-choke Solex carburetors.

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SOURCEautoweek
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