The TV cameras Apollo left on the Moon

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The Apollo TV Camera refers to several television cameras used in the Apollo program’s space missions, and on the later Skylab and Apollo-Soyuz Test Project missions, in the late 1960s and 1970s. These cameras varied in design, with image quality improving significantly with each successive model. Two companies made these various camera systems: RCA and Westinghouse.

image credit: Curious Droid 

A color camera — using a field-sequential color system — flew on the Apollo 10 mission in May 1969, and every mission after that. The Color Camera ran at the North American standard 30 fps. The cameras all used image pickup tubes that were initially fragile, as one was irreparably damaged during the live broadcast of the Apollo 12 mission’s first moonwalk.(wikipedia)

image credit: Curious Droid 

Starting with the Apollo 15 mission, a more robust, damage-resistant camera was used on the lunar surface. All of these cameras required signal processing back on Earth to make the frame rate and color encoding compatible with analog broadcast television standards.

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Apollo 17 was the last mission to the moon but if no one else is there, who’s operating the TV camera as it pans up and follows the ascent module when it returned to Earth? here’s a clue… it’s not Stanley Kubrick.In the Apollo 17 Lunar Module, and the moment when Gene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt, the last men to stand on the Moon’s surface left to return to earth… but if no one else is there, who’s operating the camera as it pans up and follows the ascent module?

The view is actually from a video camera mounted on the Lunar Rover, which remains on the moon to this day. Remotely operated by ground control via the large high gain antenna on the rover itself, the shot was meticulously planned, and timed to account for the 1.2-second delay in radio signal across 384,000 kilometres or 238,000 miles.NASA contracted the American company RCA to design a portable camera that could film the astronauts during their rover excursions.

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SOURCEcurious-droid
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