Why Air Force Uses Teslas To Chase the U-2 Spy Plane During Takeoffs

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The Lockheed U-2S “Spy Plane”! Dating to the early 1950’s and still in active service with the USAF in 2017. We see two example’s departing RAF Fairford in true dramatic style.. These things climb like rockets. I zoomed right in on the pre-flight checks by the chase cars, please watch carefully as the wingtip wheels trop of on rotate!

image/text credit: ElliotL- CBGSpotterHD

Lockheed’s U-2S spy planes are famously difficult to launch and land. Their extremely poor field of vision requires a chase car on the ground that can keep up with them.It has always been an extremely difficult plane to operate and Mythbusters even suggested that it could be “the most difficult plane to fly” in the world.

They use some powerful vehicles and now we learn that the Air Force has turned to the all-electric Tesla Model S to launch its own spy planes.The Air Force uses Tesla Model S and puts a highly trained pilot in the driver’s seat. Those pilots then act as ground-based wingmen for the U-2s in the air, talking them through runway operations.”(electrek).

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As it turns out, electric cars are not a bad match for the job since they need quick acceleration and they only have to go fast for short periods of time.It requires a top speed of 140 mph and the Tesla Model S can reach 155 mph (250 km/h).

VIAElliotL- CBGSpotterHD
SOURCEelectrek
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