How a TV Screen Really Works In Super Slow Motion

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If you are reading this, you’ve seen a screen with your eyes. But have you REALLY seen it though? Like real proper seen it? Don’t worry, Gav is here to help you out. This is How a TV works in Slow Motion.The Slow Mo Guys gave an in-depth look at how a television works with help from his slow motion equipment.

image/text credit: The Slow Mo Guys 

Free’s slow motion segments were filmed with the Phantom Flex and Phantom V2511 high-speed cameras between 1,600 and 380,000fps. While filming a TV screen with a regular camera, it’s easy to see the screen refresh, simply because the TV’s refresh rate and the camera’s capture rate don’t sync up perfectly.

But with a high-speed camera, it’s possible to slow down that refresh rate and see it happen line by line.With an incredibly fast camera, it’s possible to see that the screen refreshes not only from top to bottom, but also from left to right.

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Each pixel is updated one at a time, so quickly that it looks like the screen refreshes all at once to the naked eye.So next time you’re watching a video on your TV, remember it’s just moving too fast for you to see what’s really going on.